Posted in asjipkupjnct

Farrell to replace Schmidt as Ireland coach after World Cup

first_imgJoe Schmidt is stepping down as Ireland head coach after the 2019 World Cup in Japan and will be replaced by defence coach Andy Farrell, the Irish Rugby Football Union (IRFU) said on Monday.Since taking on the job in 2013, Schmidt has overseen the team’s most successful period, winning three Six Nations titles, as well as victories over New Zealand and a series triumph in Australia to announce Ireland as serious World Cup contenders.Schmidt has been touted as a successor to Steve Hansen as coach of his native New Zealand when both of their contracts expire after the 2019 tournament, though he indicated on Monday that he would take a break from rugby next year.“I have decided to finish coaching and will prioritise family commitments after the RWC (World Cup) in 2019,” Schmidt, who has spoken previously about his teenage son’s difficulties with epilepsy, said in an IRFU statement.“There are some inspiring challenges over the next 11 months so there’s plenty of motivation for me to continue working hard, alongside the other management staff, so that the team can be as competitive as possible.”Schmidt has spent the past eight years in Ireland, having coached Leinster to two European titles before taking the national job and marking his first season in charge with Ireland’s second Six Nations title in almost three decades.The hugely popular 53-year-old coach’s methodical approach has made him as sought after off the pitch as on it and IRFU Chief Executive Philip Browne paid tribute to his work with local clubs and fundraising for charity.“Sport has the ability to lift people out of the day-to-day concerns of life and Joe, and his team, have provided historic moments of great joy that will live long in the memories of everyone in the rugby family,” Browne said.Former dual-code international Farrell has been credited with bolstering Ireland’s defence since coming on board in 2016. Ireland’s 16-9 victory last week made Ireland the first team since 2014 — apart from the Farrell-aided British and Irish Lions — to beat the All Blacks without conceding a try.Farrell, who was let go by his native England in their post-2015 World Cup clearout, paid tribute to Schmidt, saying it was a privilege to be considered for such a “prestigious role” with the team ranked number two in the world.“I have learned a lot from Joe over the past few seasons and I will continue to learn from him over the next year as the coaching group and players focus on competing in two huge tournaments in 2019,” Farrell said.Ireland begin the defence of their Six Nations title at home to England in February before heading to the World Cup, where they have been drawn in Pool A with hosts Japan, Scotland, Russia and Samoa.last_img read more

Posted in asjipkupjnct

Safer fogging for mosquitoes

first_imgDear Editor,Recently, the Public Health Ministry fogged the area in which I lived for mosquitoes. It is good to see evidence of the Ministry’s efforts to eradicate vector-borne diseases caused by mosquitoes. I would like to suggest two things to the Health Ministry to bolster their efforts in this fight and in the fight to improve health over all.The first is the announcement of its fogging schedule via the Sunday newspapers, social media, mobile phone, television, or radio to give homeowners some advance time to prepare for these exercises by covering utensils and indoor water bodies and by cooking and eating earlier. As the Ministry is undoubtedly aware and has already considered when planning these exercises, some inorganic pesticides have the potential to remain within the air, water, soil and on other surface for a long period of time without breaking down or may break down into substances that are potentially more toxic. These substances accumulate within the fatty cells of living organisms such as human beings and over time can build up to toxic levels that can lead to long-term illnesses. Giving persons time to cover those utensils or materials that will directly enter their bodies will at least allow some measure of protection against direct ingestion of these pesticides.Secondly is the use of organic alternatives to the chemical synthetic pesticides that are used in order to control the mosquito vector. Inorganic pesticides, though highly effective in the eradication of pests are all too effective in the eradication of other living organisms also. These pesticides are known to accumulate within the fatty tissues of animals, eg humans, building up to toxic levels over time, leading to long-term illnesses. They also kill insects that are equally beneficial, such as ladybugs which control pests such as aphids and butterflies and bees which are agents of pollination.The residues from these pesticides are also washed out of the air into the soil where they affect the multitude of soil organisms that are essential to a healthy and beneficial soil.I was recently made aware of the existence of an organic pesticide developed by The Evergreen Nature Club that may be used. Has the Ministry considered using this instead? Have they considered developing one of their own, either through collaboration with the IAST or the University of Guyana using extracts from trees, herbs and grasses that are known to naturally repel mosquitoes, such as neem, crab oil, cloves, lemon grass, thyme and garlic? I have had some success in repelling mosquitoes, though only for a short time, using thyme soaked in coconut oil and garlic and cloves chopped up and burnt in a candle. I have also read of purely garlic-based organic pesticides that have been just as effective as DDT, the common ingredient in inorganic pesticides.These suggestions may help the Ministry see a reduction in mosquito-borne disease without an increase in other diseases caused by the introduction or accumulation of pesticides into the human body. Persons should also be encouraged to try these alternatives themselves in their efforts to combat these diseases.Sincerely,A concerned citizenlast_img read more

Posted in asjipkupjnct

Liberia’s Helene Cooper Shares Pulitzer Prize

first_imgLiberian-born journalist working for the New York Times, Helene Cooper, joined the newspaper’s staff yesterday as proud winners of the coveted Pulitzer Prize for “courageous front-line reporting and vivid human stories on Ebola in Africa.”  She is the first Liberian winner of a Pulitzer Prize. Ms. Cooper’s articles formed part of a series on the Ebola epidemic, including others by Norimitsu Onishi, Adam Nossiter, Ben C. Solomon, Jeffrey Gettleman, Sheri Fink, Kevin Sack and Pam Belluck winning the prize on Ebola coverage.  The stories were complemented by the Times’ photography, infographics and other digital media assets to tell as clear and complete a story as possible — which justified the Pulitzer for the paper’s entire staff.The New York Times captured two other Pulitzers.  Photographer Daniel Berehulak won the prize for feature photography covering months of images he captured documenting the spread of Ebola in West Africa. The third win was the prize for investigative reporting, for a series by Eric Lipton on aggressive efforts by lobbyists and lawyers to push state attorneys general to drop investigations, change policies, negotiate favorable settlements or pressure federal regulators to benefit their clients.  The investigative reporting prize was shared with The Wall Street Journal, which won its first Pulitzer in recent years for a project that revealed to Americans previously confidential data “on the motivations and practices of their health care providers.”The Post and Courier of Charleston, South Carolina, won the prize for Public Service, the most prestigious of the Pulitzer Prizes.  The full list of the 2015 Pulitzer Prize winners can be found at www.pulitzer.org/awards/2015.Helene Cooper is a Pentagon correspondent with The New York Times. Prior to this assignment, she covered the White House and was The Times’ diplomatic correspondent. She joined the newspaper in 2004 as the assistant editorial page editor, a position she held for two years before she ran out of opinions and returned to news. She has reported from 64 countries, from Pakistan to the Congo. Previously, Helene worked for 12 years at the Wall Street Journal, where she was a foreign correspondent, reporter and editor, working in the London, Washington and Atlanta bureaus. She is the winner of the Raymond Clapper award for Washington reporting (2000), the Sandy Hume award for best reporter under the age of 35 (2001), the Missouri Lifestyle award for feature writing (2002), a National Association of Black Journalists award for feature writing (2004), and the Urbino Press Award for foreign reporting (2011). Born in Monrovia, Liberia, Helene is the author of “The House at Sugar Beach: In Search of a Lost African Childhood” (Simon and Schuster), a New York Times best seller and a National Books Critics Circle finalist in autobiography in 2009. She holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.For Cooper, who celebrates her birthday tomorrow, April 22, winning a Pulitzer means much more than a surprise pre-birthday gift.  “I am counting down the days–16, right?–till our country can be declared Ebola free,” she told the Daily Observer.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Posted in asjipkupjnct

Minibus driver jailed on causing death charge

first_imgTherwin Hopkinson, the minibus driver charged with causing the death of William Trim on March 5, was on Monday jailed for four years.He was convicted of driving minibus BBB 1302 in a manner dangerous to the public thus causing the death of Trim on March 5, 2016 at Aubrey Barker Public Road, Greater Georgetown.The Court heard that on the day in question, the defendant had passengers in his bus and was driving in a reckless manner, overtaking several motor vehicles, when he collided with the car driven by the now dead man.The impact of the collision caused the motor car to move some distance away from the point of impact and Trim to be thrown from the vehicle. He was picked up in an unconscious state and rushed to a city hospital where he was pronounced dead on arrival.In handing down the sentence, Magistrate McLennan stated that the prosecution’s witnesses were found to be credible. She added that the Court was also satisfied with the evidence that was presented by the prosecution.McLennan noted that the injuries sustained by the deceased as a result of the accident were the cause of his death. Thus, she said, the prosecution had proven its case beyond reasonable doubt.The Chief Magistrate revealed that the Court did not find credible the defendant’s defence that theMcLennan found the defendant guilty as charged of the offence.Upon hearing the court’s decision, Hopkinson begged for leniency on the grounds that he has two young children – 18 months old and 4 years old respectively.However, McLennan did not waver in her decision, stating that a life was lost.last_img read more

Posted in asjipkupjnct

B.C.’s dispute over bitumen control likely to end up in Supreme Court: lawyers

first_imgThe court could either refuse to answer the question due to a lack of information or, more likely, provide guidelines on how permitting could work that operates within the constriction, he said.Carissima Mathen, vice dean of the University of Ottawa’s law faculty, said there is a clear conflict between the B.C. legislation and federal law.“I haven’t seen any argument as to why the federal government doesn’t have authority to regulate this interprovincial pipeline the way they have authority over all kinds of other interprovincial undertakings,” she said.Ryder said if the province’s legislation is found to only add conditions to the shipment of heavy oils, the court could determine it does not conflict with federal law.But if the federal government introduces new legislation to “fortify” its authority over Trans Mountain, it could crush B.C.’s attempt to have some legal jurisdiction, he added.Advertisement But Prof. Bruce Ryder of York University’s Osgoode Hall Law School said that case differs from B.C. because the legislation addresses all heavy oil, not just one particular project.Decisions made the B.C. Supreme Court in favour of lower levels of government having the authority to create environmental protections in relation to the Northern Gateway pipeline could also support the province’s case, Ryder said.Ryder said he thinks the court will approve the validity question. But he said there is greater uncertainty over permits that would be needed to ship heavy oils through the province because that could be seen to impair or block federal projects, which “would clearly be unconstitutional.”“What we don’t know are the details of how the permitting process will work, whether a permit will be granted when requested, what conditions would be attached to it, and absent of specific context with those actual details, it would be difficult for the court to give anything other than a somewhat speculative answer,” he said.Advertisement VANCOUVER, B.C. — B.C.’s court case over the flow of heavy oil through the province could be damaged by the NDP government’s previous positions against the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline, says a legal expert.The provincial government filed a reference case Thursday in the B.C. Court of Appeal asking whether amendments it is proposing to the Environmental Management Act are valid and if they give the province the authority to control the shipment of heavy oils based on the impact spills could have on the environment, human health or communities.The province is also asking the court whether the amendments are over-riden by federal law.- Advertisement -Nigel Bankes, chair of natural resources law at the University of Calgary, said he believes the province will lose on the validity question because it is targeting a federally approved project, even though the legislation covers broad environmental concerns.“All rhetoric, all the public announcements, all the announcements from the premier and the relevant ministers make it clear that this legislation is actually directed at Trans Mountain,” he said.Bankes said a precedent was set in 1984 when the courts ruled the government of Newfoundland and Labrador acted outside its authority by introducing legislation that disrupted Quebec’s right to access hydroelectric power from Churchill Falls.Advertisement All the experts expect the case to be appealed to the Supreme Court of Canada.Kathryn Harrison, a political science professor at the University of British Columbia, said there are many areas where provincial and federal jurisdiction come into conflict, but given the fact the environment is not addressed in the constitution, legal battles over environmental authority are rare.“It would be good for Canada and the global environment if we had more disputes over environmental jurisdiction,” she said, adding negotiations and compromise often result in “watering down” policies.Here are the three questions the B.C. government has referred to the Court of Appeal:Is the draft legislation within provincial jurisdiction to enact?Would the draft legislation be applicable to hazardous substances brought into British Columbia by means of an interprovincial undertaking?Is there any federal legislation that is inconsistent with the proposed amendments that would render the proposed amendments inoperative?By Linda GivetashAdvertisement THE CANADIAN PRESSlast_img read more

Posted in asjipkupjnct

Clear-out at Liverpool! Five players who must leave Anfield

first_img 5 5 The transfer window is firmly wedged open, which means clubs are busy carrying out their business as they prepare for the coming Premier League season.While supporters invariably focus on players on their way into their club, others may have to be relinquished to balance the books.Some players have fallen out of favour, while others may just need a change of scenery to help rejuvenate their careers.Liverpool are expected to take their spending to over £80million this summer having triggered the release clause of Aston Villa striker Christian Benteke.The Belgian would be the seventh player to arrive at Anfield in the window, joining James Milner, Danny Ings, Roberto Firmino, Nathaniel Clyne, Joe Gomez and Adam Bogdan in a new look Liverpool squad.However, Brendan Rodgers may look to identify who is surplus to requirements on Merseyside, so talkSPORT has offered a helping hand with a list of players who should be offloaded before the season starts.Click the yellow arrow above, right, to see which players make our shortlist. 5 5 5. Joe Allen – The midfielder has flattered to deceive – Dubbed the ‘Welsh Xavi’ by manager Brendan Rodgers, Joe Allen has failed to convince many Liverpool fans of his talents. With James Milner joining the midfield alongside England team-mate Jordan Henderson, Allen might find himself frozen out of the starting eleven. 4. Fabio Borini – The Italian striker has misfired during his disjointed Reds career. Click right to see which midfielder could be crowded out this season – The 24 year-old was Brendan Rodgers’ first signing for Liverpool having enjoyed a promising spell in Serie A with Roma. That was back in 2012 and Borini hasn’t yet been able to establish himself on Merseyside. Perhaps it is time to move on permanently; Borini did well on loan at Sunderland so may be an astute signing for a few Premier league clubs. 2. Mario Balotelli – Brendan Rodgers’ gamble on the striker has backfired. Click right to see which defender is down the pecking order at Anfield – You never know what you’re going to get with Mario Balotelli, but Liverpool fans would have expected a little more return on the £16 million the club paid for him. With just one Premier league goal, Balotelli was part of an uninspiring forward line as Liverpool tumbled out of the top four. The eccentric striker has been linked with a move back to his native country, with both Fiorentina and Lazio mooted. 1. Rickie Lambert – The England man has failed to impress since making his dream move to Liverpool. Continue to find out which other striker should look for a new club – It looks as if the fairy tale story of Lambert’s Liverpool career may not have a happy ending. The 33-year old netted just twice in his debut season at Anfield and lost his place in the England squad. With Benteke likely to arrive soon, and Divock Origi arriving from Lille, Lambert could find himself way down the pecking order at Liverpool. West Brom are chasing the striker, with Tony Pulis a keen admirer. 3. Jose Enrique – The Spanish left back may look for regular playing time. Continue to see which former Chelsea player would benefit from a move – Enrique signed from Newcastle in 2011 with a glowing reputation. However it has been a frustrating time for the Spaniard having been plagued by injuries. Fellow countryman Alberto Moreno joined last summer and established himself as first choice, meaning Enrique was reduced to just four appearances and may be on his way out as Rodgers attempts to trim his squad. 5last_img read more

Posted in asjipkupjnct

Celtic to ease into Champions League proper? Liverpool to win EFL Cup? Coral DD

first_imgCoral’s Simon Clare joins the Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast to round up the latest sporting odds.Celtic bid to book their place in the Champions League group stage when they take on Hapoel Be’er Sheva in Israel on Tuesday night.The Hoops are 5-2 up from the first leg of the qualifying clash and the draw [5/2] is proving a popular bet.Liverpool are also in action on Tuesday night, travelling to Burton in the EFL Cup action at Burton, and Jurgen Klopp’s side are 7/1 to go on and win the competition.Coral is the official betting partner of the Alan Brazil Sports Breakfastlast_img read more

Posted in asjipkupjnct

Transplant gives student new life

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREFrumpy Middle-aged Mom: My realistic 2020 New Year’s resolutions. Some involve doughnuts.Walsh underwent the three-hour transplant surgery July 27 at University of California, Los Angeles, Medical Center. The procedure would not have been possible without financial help from a nonprofit agency founded by Walsh’s doctor and Kaiser Permanente. The Foundation to Improve Renal Nutrition was started in 2004 by Philip Tuso, a nephrologist at Kaiser’s Lancaster medical offices, to increase public awareness of kidney disease and raise money to supply costly nutritional supplements to protein-malnourished patients with kidney failure. FIRN enabled Walsh to receive post-transplant care by providing funding for temporary housing near UCLA, and Kaiser provided transportation from Walsh’s home to UCLA’s Westwood campus. Before the formation of FIRN, Tuso and other members of the medical team at Walsh’s dialysis clinic pooled funds to help buy expensive medication that she could not afford due to her limited income but was vital to keep her alive. Tuso is physician director of Fresenius Medical Care Dialysis Unit in Lancaster. “She was one of many in the unit that was requiring assistance,” Tuso said. “Valerie wasn’t working. A lot of others had to stop work. They were unable to work, and for the first time in their life experienced financial strain.” Walsh was starting her freshman year at Highland High School in 1995 when a physical shed light on why she had been feeling exhausted and going to the nurse’s office, complaining of weakness. Tests showed she was in the beginning stages of kidney failure. She was diagnosed with IgA nephropathy, a chronic kidney disease that usually first appears during adolescence and young adulthood and often progresses to kidney failure. About a year later, Walsh began dialysis three times a week, with each session lasting three to five hours. “It was very tiring,” Walsh recalled. “It puts a major cramp in your schedule. Any general activities need to be scheduled around dialysis. It really slowed me down going to school.” Unable to go continue with classes, she tried independent study but couldn’t keep up with the work and failed to graduate. When offered a chance to be put on a list to have a kidney transplant, Walsh demurred, uncomfortable with the concept. “I was just weirded out by the whole thing, having someone else’s kidney in me. I was 15, and you think, `Gross!”‘ Walsh said. But she eventually changed her mind as time passed and her condition failed to improve. Since the transplant, Walsh said the most profound change has been her diet. What was bad for her before, she can now consume without fear. “Now everything is flipped,” she said. “I had to watch how much I drank before. I was only allowed four cups of fluid per day. Now I’m told to drink two liters a day.” Before, she had to avoid foods high in phosphorus – dairy products, beans and, a favorite, colas – and potassium – bananas, tomatoes and potatoes. In kidney failure, excess potassium can cause sudden death and too much phosphorus can cause calcification of blood vessels. “Oh, my God, I can handle all that stuff now. I can drink all the cola I want now,” Walsh said. Walsh has more energy and is adjusting to life without dialysis. “I feel much better,” she said. “When my sister lets me, I can do more things around the house, even just basic cleaning. I don’t like to clean, but I like fact that I can.” She no longer has to rise at 4:30 a.m. to go to dialysis. “Now I have all this time on my hands. I’m trying to figure out ways to fill it,” Walsh said. She is thinking of volunteering at Kaiser in Lancaster. She can now be a full-time student and plans on entering the medical field, a career choice inspired by her experience. “I was always in a hospital environment. I picked up on medical terminology and procedures. It really piqued my interest,” Walsh said. Walsh said she plans to write a thank-you letter to her kidney donor’s family. “I’m still trying to work on how I will write the letter,” Walsh said. “It’s kind of awkward: `I’m sorry your daughter had to die. At least her kidney didn’t go to waste.’ I do plan on doing as much with this kidney as long as I have it.” karen.maeshiro@dailynews.com (661) 267-5744160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! LANCASTER – For the first time in nearly a decade, 25-year-old Valerie Walsh is not tethered to a dialysis machine that kept her alive. The part-time Antelope Valley College student underwent a kidney transplant in late July that freed her from a previous life of constant exhaustion, time-consuming dialysis sessions and uncertainty. Walsh, who initially was turned off by the idea of having someone else’s kidney inside her, knows little about her kidney donor, except that she was a 27-year-old woman. “I treat it like my baby. You can feel the kidney; it’s a little bump right here,” Walsh said, pointing to her side. “I’m careful not to bump up against anything. I will try to be cautious of what I do to make sure I keep it as long as I can.” last_img
Posted in asjipkupjnct

Marjorie Lucille McCutcheon Lapping, 92

first_imgLindley and Edith Irene Veatch. She graduated from Paoli High School in 1941, attended EarlhamCollege one year and during World War II was a lab technician at E.I. Du Pont de Nemours at Charleston,Indiana on the swing shift for 2 years. She earned a BS in Home Economics from Indiana University andtaught 5 years at Paoli, 4 years at Thornton Fractional Township High School in Calumet City, Illinois.She attended University of Colorado two summers and while there was told she was the first women toclimb the back of the Red Rocks near Denver. She received MS in Education from IU. She marriedHomer Gene McCutcheon from West Baden on August 27, 1953 and continued to teach in Calumet Cityand after having two children they moved to Indianapolis where she taught 25 years at ArsenalTechnical High School. She earned Certification in Audio-Visual from Indiana University and A-VDirector for 12 years. She is listed in the 1973-1974 issue of Outstanding Educators in America. Shewas interested in photography , genealogy, gardening, and using the computer.Gene died January 1, 1974 and she later married Philip Lapping on November 8, 1975, Sheretired June 1, 1984, after teaching 34 years and returned to her home town of Paoli on October 8,1987, served 7 years as president of the Orange County Historical Society, 1 year as Vice Regent of theLost River Chapter DAR. She belonged to the Paoli Friends Meeting, Arsenal Technical High School,Retired Teacher Association-life member; VP Orange County Genealogy Society, Washington CountyGenealogy Society; Veitch Historical Society; American Home Economics Association-Emeritus;Association for Educational Communications & Technology.She was preceded in death by her parents, husband Gene McCutcheon, husband Philip Lapping,one sister Thelma Foddrill, and one step grandchild Ethel Elaine HillSurvivors include:Son: David Gene McCutcheons Indianapolis, INDaughter: Mary Ann Staley Paragon Indianapolis, INSister: Helen Marshall Hardinsburg, INGrandchildren: Laurie Jean Staley-Jones; Logan Gene Staley; Sara Jean McCutcheon; CandiceRose McCutcheon; David Gene McCutheon Jr., Stephen Byers. Great-Grandchildren: Corbin JamesStaley; Ethan Joseph Jones; Isabel Maxine Jones; Trinity Nicole Jones, Richard Joseph Levarn IV, Aunt:June Veatch, Cousins: Dr. William Veatch Howells; John Mach Howells; Mariella Clements Stout;Geraldine Veatch Allender, Stephen Day; Jennifer Day Doyle.Funeral services will be 2:00 PM, Tuesday, May 5, 2015 at the Paoli Friends Meeting, Paoli, IN Visitationto be held from 10:00 AM until the time of service at the church on Tuesday. Interment to follow at thePaoli Community Cemetery. Dillman-Scott Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangementsOnline Condolences may be made at Dillman-Scott Funeral Home.Com Marjorie Lucille McCutcheon Lapping, 92 of Paoli passed away Thursday April 30, 2015 at,Bloomington, IN. She was born on June 1, 1923 on Tater Road in Orange County to Franklin Elwoodlast_img read more