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Pocari Sweat keeps Myla Pablo for 5 years with lucrative deal

first_imgEDITORS’ PICK Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine We are young As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise Racela proud to see former Tamaraws making impact in PBA Senators to proceed with review of VFA Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PHcenter_img “She’s been us with two years, we know her capability and we’re happy. We’re hopeful that we will get the championship again,” said Roland Tieng, Federated Distributor Inc. executive director.Pocari Sweat Philippines president Sinichi Suzuki also said the move means the time is committed to being a consistent championship contender in the coming years.“Myla signing with Pocari assures us that Pocari Sweat will be champions for the next five years.”For her part, the 23-year-old Pablo said that as always, she will try her best to deliver for Pocari Sweat.We should stop thinking we’re champions. We have to work hard in our trainings and workouts every day,” she said. “You have to work hard for everything you do. I know we still can be champions as long as we have teamwork and the team stays intact.ADVERTISEMENT PH among economies most vulnerable to virus MOST READ Pablo also received a brand new white Hyundai Accent as a part of her signing bonus in the lucrative deal.Lady Warriors team manager Eric Ty shared that this just the first of the franchise’s move to retain their championship-winning core, saying, “We have decided to commit to her.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad Ali“Our long-term strategy is to preserve a championship team. We’re looking at our options. We must look at the fact that there’s no thing as a static team. In our case, we’ll try our best to preserve and bring them back and maybe signing a few more to longer term contracts.”Pocari Sweat management has also expressed satisfaction with the momentous move. Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND View comments Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Myla Pablo poses with her brandnew car as part of her signing bonus with Pocari Sweat. Photo by Randolph LeongsonAfter winning two titles in the past Shakey’s V-League season, Pocari Sweat signed one of its key players Myla Pablo to a landmark five-year contract on Tuesday.“I’m so happy because they trusted me,” the open hitter said. “I didn’t have any second thoughts because I know they will take care of me. I trust them too.”ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

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Wildlife conservation strategies must take animals’ social lives into account: Researchers

first_imgAnimal Behavior, Animal Intelligence, Animals, Birds, Chimpanzees, Conservation, Elephants, Environment, Human-wildlife Conflict, Mammals, Marine Animals, Marine Mammals, Research, Whales, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation In a paper published in Science last month, an international team of researchers argues that the growing body of evidence on the importance of social learning and animal cultures must be taken more fully into account in order to improve wildlife conservation efforts.“Animal culture” consists of information and behaviors shared amongst members of a wildlife community, such as a flock of migratory birds, a herd of elephants, or a pod of whales. For whooping cranes to retain knowledge of migration routes across generations, for instance, this knowledge must be passed between members of the flock through what scientists call “social learning.”Despite the mounting evidence of the far-reaching implications of social learning for the preservation of wildlife, however, international policy forums that devise large-scale conservation strategies “have so far not engaged substantially with the challenges and opportunities presented by this new scientific perspective,” the researchers note. There’s a chimpanzee population in Western Africa that uses tools to crack open nuts. Scientists theorize that this behavior provides the chimps with access to an important source of food during the dry season, so it’s no wonder that this behavior has been passed down from generation to generation.This is just one example of the many distinct cultures that wildlife populations around the world have developed in order to adapt and thrive in their environments.In a paper published in Science last month, an international team of researchers argues that the growing body of evidence on the importance of social learning and animal cultures must be taken more fully into account in order to improve wildlife conservation efforts.“Animal culture” consists of information and behaviors shared amongst members of a wildlife community, such as a flock of migratory birds, a herd of elephants, or a pod of whales. For whooping cranes to retain knowledge of migration routes across generations, for instance, this knowledge must be passed between members of the flock through what scientists call “social learning.”The authors of the Science paper, led by Philippa Brakes of the University of Exeter in the UK, cite a number of implications that the transmission of behaviors and knowledge through social learning can have for a species’ conservation, ranging from positive — “e.g., adaptive exploitation of a new food source” — to negative — “e.g., increasing conflict with humans, such as when sperm whales learn to remove fish from longlines.” Social learning can lead to distinct cultures amongst subpopulations, “erecting social barriers” between, say, different vocal clans of sperm whales — and this “cultural segregation” can mean that separate groups of animals can have very different foraging strategies, which in turn affects their ability to cope with environmental change. It can also lead to the “increased importance of key individuals as repositories of accumulated knowledge,” meaning that the targeted protection of, as an example, certain African elephant matriarchs, can be crucial to the preservation of a particular herd of elephants.African elephants. Photo Credit: Vicki Fishlock, Amboseli Trust for Elephants.Thus, animal culture “can have important consequences for the survival and reproduction of individuals, social groups, and potentially, entire populations,” the authors write. “Understanding the importance of behavioral diversity will benefit conservation policies both when assessing the status of potentially vulnerable populations (e.g., when delineating units to conserve, by accounting for cultural segregation) and when devising effective conservation strategies (e.g., by identifying key repositories of social knowledge).”These types of insights can help humans design effective wildlife conservation interventions. “Positive conservation outcomes can depend on the restoration of cultural knowledge,” Brakes and team add in the paper. “For example, because whooping cranes learn migratory routes socially, human surrogates in ultralight aircraft can guide naïve, captive-bred birds along their first migration, potentially boosting the effectiveness of reintroduction programs.”Despite the mounting evidence of the far-reaching implications of social learning for the preservation of wildlife, however, international policy forums that devise large-scale conservation strategies “have so far not engaged substantially with the challenges and opportunities presented by this new scientific perspective,” the researchers note. The result is that conservation strategies have tended to be largely focused on demographic-level responses by wildlife species to their changing environments and the preservation of genetically defined groups of animals deemed evolutionarily significant.“Beyond genes, knowledge is also an important currency for wildlife,” Brakes said in a statement. “As well as conserving genetic diversity, we must work towards maintaining cultural diversity within animal populations, as a reservoir for resilience and adaptation. This is an important reframing of our understanding of the natural world, which will necessitate changes in international wildlife law.”A humpback whale. Photo Credit: Cetacean Ecology and Acoustics Laboratory, UQ.Brakes and colleagues highlight the United Nations Environment Programme’s Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS, often referred to simply as the Bonn Convention) as one of the few international policy-making bodies that is applying our understanding of animal cultures to better protect the world’s wildlife, in this case migratory species.“This new frontier of animal culture and social complexity opens a fascinating and innovative perspective on how we consider animals; from single components of population models to individuals who offer specific contributions to the rest of the social group,” Dr. Fernando Spina, chair of the CMS Scientific Council and a co-author of the Science paper, said in a statement. “When thinking of strategies to conserve migratory animals, which is the main mission of CMS at the global level, with individual animals visiting different countries along their annual cycle, cultural transmission of knowledge on how to fulfill their incredible migratory journeys is a new component environmental policies should fully take into account.”The authors argue that it is important for other international environmental agreements, such as the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), to consider animal culture in their scientific assessments and policy decision-making. “We see opportunities to extend our approach beyond species and issues currently covered by CMS, for example, when assessing the sustainability of exports and trade through CITES processes,” they write. “Such consideration is timely, because 2020 is the final year of the United Nations Decade on Biodiversity, when governments will negotiate the Post-2020 Biodiversity Framework.”Study co-author Christian Rutz, a professor at the University of St Andrews in the UK, called our growing understanding of the conservation significance of animals’ social lives “an incredibly important development,” adding: “Decades of research on animal cultures are now being put to good use in conservation science and policy making, and we have a much better idea of what knowledge gaps still need filling.”An adult chimp cracks a nut with a rock while a juvenile looks on. Photo Credit: Tetsuro Matsuzawa, Primate Research Institute, Kyoto.CITATION• Brakes, P. et al. (2019). Animal cultures matter for conservation. Science, 363(6431), 1032-1034. doi:10.1126/science.aaw3557 Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more